Particularlymustthisbet(a) hecaseona(sense) soilassacredtotheAmerican(so) imagination as that ofEdinburgh. The glories of the philosophic chair of this university

were deeply NeoStrataimpressed on myimagination in boyhood. Professor Fraser's Essays in Philosophy, then just published, was the firstphilosophic book I ever looked into,

and I well remember the awestruck feeling I received from theaccount of Sir William Hamilton's classroom therein contained. Hamilton's own lectures were thefirst

philosophic writings I ever forced myself to study, and after that I was immersed in DugaldStewart and Thomas Brown. Such juvenile emotions of reverence never get

outgrown; and Iconfess that to find my humble self promoted from my native wilderness to be actually for the timean official here, and transmuted into a colleague of

these illustrious names, carries with it a senseof dreamland quite as much as of reality.

But since I have received the honor of this appointment I have felt that it would never do todecline. The academic career also has its heroic obligations, so I stand

here without furtherdeprecatory words. Let me say only this, that now that the current, here and at Aberdeen, hasbegun to run from west to east, I hope it may

continue to do so. As the years go by, I hope thatmany of my countrymen may be asked to lecture in the Scottish universities ORM, changing places withScotsmen lecturing

 

in the United States; I hope that our people may become in all these highermatters even as one people; and that the peculiar philosophic temperament, as well as the

peculiarpolitical temperament, that goes with our English speech may more and more pervade andinfluence the world.

As regards the manner in which I shall have to administer this lectureship, I am neither atheologian, nor a scholar learned in the history of religions, nor an

anthropologist. Psychology isthe only branch of learning in which I am particularly versed. To the psychologist the religiouspropensities of man must be at least as

interesting as any other of the facts pertaining to his mentalconstitution. It would seem, therefore, that, as a psychologist, the natural thing for me would be

toinvite you to a descriptive survey of those religious propensities.

If the inquiry be psychological, not religious institutions, but rather religious feelings andreligious impulses must be its subject, and I must confine myself to

those more  recorded in literature produced by articulate and fully self-conscious men,in works of piety and autobiography. Interesting

as the origins and early stages of a subject alwaysare, yet when one seeks earnestly for its full significance, one must always look to its morecompletely evolved

and perfect forms. It follows from this that the documents that will mostconcern us will be those of the men who were most accomplished in the religious life and

best ableto give an intelligible account of their ideas and motives Dream beauty pro.